e4e Week 4

Connecting social policy: climate change, health, AIDS and girls’ education

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Time

Discussion May 3rd – 7th
Keynote Tuesday, 04 May 2010, 14.30 UTC
View Keynote Recording
Moderators Relebohile Moletsane and Patricia Ames

Brief

Another key challenge is to overcome the lack of connection between different levels and forms of policy formulation and practice, and how to build and support participatory processes that involve a wide constituency in confronting gross inequities. What is entailed goes well beyond the task of enrolling girls’ names on registers or seating them in class. Schemes such as school feeding, which tackle both attendance and the health problems for girls associated with malnutrition in adolescence, are not widespread enough. There has been recognition that school is an important site to provide some of the education that could protect against the spread of HIV, but very few countries have given sufficient attention to gender in their education and HIV plans, and realising gender equality in schools in the context of the epidemic has been enormously difficult. Nonetheless enormously creative and diverse initiatives are underway, despite the harshness of the present moment, so marked by inequality, conflict, and threats associated with climate change and economic recession.

Resources

Discussion papers

Lang Title Authors
  EN Connecting social policy: climate change, health, AIDS and girls’ education Relebohile Moletsane and Patricia Ames
1. EN Harnessing energy crisis and gender empowerment: Impacts of household energy consumption pattern on women’s welfare and education Folaranmi D. Babalola
2. EN Sustainable futures, durable inequalities: Investigating the linkages between the promotion of sustainability and gender equality in education Stefan Bengtsson
3. EN Expanding access to quality education in Africa by 2015: The case for the girl with visual impairment Wilfred Mugo Maina
4. EN Youth as development partners (narrated slide presentation) Catherine Ndunge Mbindyo

Dakar Abstracts

The following abstracts report on papers to be presented in Dakar from 17-20 May 2010:

  Lang Title Authors
1. EN Gender, Schooling and Poverty in Peru Patricia Ames, Rita Carrillo
2. EN Lessons on Food and Hunger: In Search of Transformative Education Anita Rampal, Harsh Mandar
3. EN Engendering Rural Eye Care for Access to Education Ajita Vidyarthi, Rajat Chabba

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18 Responses to “e4e Week 4”

  1. Yvette Dembélé says:

    Les changements climatiques engendrent de nombreux fléaux dont la sécheresse avec pour conséquences des récoltes insuffisantes, des pénuries d’eau donc des corvées d’eau entre autres. Toutes choses qui réduisent considérablement les revenus des familles et rend difficile le règlement des frais de scolarité et autres coûts d’opportunité dans les zones défavorisées. L’insuffisance des moyens conduit souvent les familles à porter le choix de l’enfant à scolariser sur le garçon au détriment de la fille.
    Or l’éducation des filles est fondamentale pour le développement de tous. D’où la nécessité de prendre des mesures adéquates pour lutter contre les changements climatiques en vue d’accroître les chances de maintien et de succès des filles dans le système scolaire.

  2. -si la fille est orpheline des deux parents, très souvent c'est elle qui s'occupe de ses petits frères et petites soeurs. Elle quitte les bancs pour s'adonner à des activités génératrices de revenu dans le pire des cas à la prostitution afin de subvenir aux besoins de ces derniers.
    2) Le cas où la fille est infectée:
    La fille infectéé et fréquemment malade ne va plus à l'école pour éviter la stigmatisation, le mépris et le rejet de ses camarades.

  3. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Yishay Mor, e4 conference. e4 conference said: What are the effects of the HIV and AIDS epidemic on girls’ #education?Get involved in this week's E4conf debate. http://ow.ly/1Gvnl #e4conf [...]

  4. Tim says:

    Q5
    What kinds of interventions are needed to successfully intervene against the negative impacts of HIV and AIDS as well as of climate change on gender equality in education, and particularly on girls education?

    • Stacy says:

      One major factor to mitigate HIV impacts on girls' education would be the awareness by communities (meaning, families and girls) and enforcement of child protection policies refraining teahers from sexually exploiting their female students, which is still unfortunately common in some parts of the world.
      Another intervention would be strengthen and promote Adolescent-Friendly SRH centers for youth, where girls could get prevention information, confidential counseling and testing, and treatment referrals for HIV; lack of AF Health Posts and Centers' was cited as the single greatest barrier to youth seeking SH info and services in the FP Conference in Uganda last November–we need to remove this barrier so girls can stay healthy and stay in school.

    • Stacy says:

      One major factor to mitigate HIV impacts on girls' education would be the awareness by communities (meaning, families and girls) and enforcement of child protection policies refraining teahers from sexually exploiting their female students, which is still unfortunately common in some parts of the world.
      Another intervention would be strengthen and promote Adolescent-Friendly SRH centers for youth, where girls could get prevention information, confidential counseling and testing, and treatment referrals for HIV; lack of AF Health Posts and Centers' was cited as the single greatest barrier to youth seeking SH info and services in the FP Conference in Uganda last November–we need to remove this barrier so girls can stay healthy and stay in school.

  5. Tim says:

    Q4
    In what ways has climate change impacted on girls’ lives and their participation and success in education?

    • Yvette Dembélé says:

      En Afrique, les facteurs socioculturels engendrent de nombreux obstacles persistants mais aussi de nouveaux défis à l’éducation des filles. Les filles sont fortement sollicitées pour participer à la survie de la famille. C’est ainsi que leur participation aux tâches domestiques et aux activités génératrices de revenus influence négativement leurs résultats scolaires en raison de la réduction du temps qu’elles consacrent à leurs études.

    • Stacy says:

      From what we've seen in some of our program areas, climate change is no different than other structural factors that affect social equity and development issues: the poor are hit hardest; girls are the poorest of the poor. Climate change often means unpredicatable rainy seasons, and this means sustenance farmers scramble to plant and harvest erratically, often pulling kids (often girls) from school with little notice. It also means fewer successful crops (of vegetables or even fish, as climate change affects waterways as well), which leads to less family income, which often means pulling kids (again, girls first) from school. Upset rainy seasons can also mean girls walking farther for water, as was highlighted in today's discussion.

    • Stacy says:

      From what we've seen in some of our program areas, climate change is no different than other structural factors that affect social equity and development issues: the poor are hit hardest; girls are the poorest of the poor. Climate change often means unpredicatable rainy seasons, and this means sustenance farmers scramble to plant and harvest erratically, often pulling kids (often girls) from school with little notice. It also means fewer successful crops (of vegetables or even fish, as climate change affects waterways as well), which leads to less family income, which often means pulling kids (again, girls first) from school. Upset rainy seasons can also mean girls walking farther for water, as was highlighted in today's discussion.

    • Stacy says:

      What we're learning in Plan is that insecure situations–whether from climate change or political instability–is that strengthening support to more and more de-centralized levels, like VIllage Development Committees or Women's Income Generation Groups, is a crtical flexible response mechanism. this can apply to girls' and climate change too. helping communities (not just central-level govts) develop Risk Reduction Plans; revolving funds for educaiton costs or family loans if their crops fail; Youth Enterprise programs–all are succesful vehicles to protect girls from the effects of cliate change at the level they live.

    • Stacy says:

      What we're learning in Plan is that insecure situations–whether from climate change or political instability–is that strengthening support to more and more de-centralized levels, like VIllage Development Committees or Women's Income Generation Groups, is a crtical flexible response mechanism. this can apply to girls' and climate change too. helping communities (not just central-level govts) develop Risk Reduction Plans; revolving funds for educaiton costs or family loans if their crops fail; Youth Enterprise programs–all are succesful vehicles to protect girls from the effects of cliate change at the level they live.

    • Bénoudji says:

      Les changements climatiques accentuent la vulnérabilité des couches les plus vulnérables et rendent précaires les moyens d’existence. Or nous savons que les filles ont déjà trop d’obstacles à franchir pour leur fréquentation et leur réussite donc cela ne peut qu’accentuer leur sort si la communauté internationale n’engage pas urgemment une action intégrée autour et au sein de l’école pour laa lutte contre les changements climatiques. Une vision sytémique s’impose!

      • As one of the groups so drastically affected by climate change and disasters, children and youth, including girls, have a right to be directly involved in the making of decisions that govern how we adapt and minimise the impact of climate and disaster risks. This right is upheld by the UNCRC’s article 12. Yet in order to engage in decision making and the promotion of accountable services, adolescent girls must have greater opportunities to increase their knowledge and skills in relation to DRR and Climate Change Adaptation.

        Prioritising the education and agency of young people, particularly girls, is essential in any society’s efforts to manage risks and develop sustainably. Sustainable and resilient development can be best realised when risks are made visible and transparent. It also requires that vulnerable people, including girls, have sufficient information to take decisions on how best to address the risks they face (both natural and social), and on how to hold duty bearers accountable for their safety and wellbeing.

        Informed and motivated citizens will demand good governance for managing risks. And good governance will thrive on the input of proactive DRR-informed citizens, including girls.

  6. Tim says:

    Q3
    In which ways have particular understandings of gender and discourses around gender and education been used in work on HIV and AIDS? What have been the consequences of this?

  7. Tim says:

    Q2
    What are the effects of the HIV and AIDS epidemic on girls’ education?

    • Contribution du Centre International pour l’Education des Filles et des Femmes en Afrique de l’Union Africaine (UA/CIEFFA)
      L'UNESCO (2000) dit que l'éducation des flles est " un outil efficace de développement social, les avantages en sont immédiats sur les plans de la nutrition, de la santé, de l'épargne et des réinvestissements, tant à l'échelon de la famille qu'à ceux de la collectivité et du pays". Mais, le constat en Afrique au Sud du Sahara est que ont un taux de prévalence au VIH élevé. Quels sont les effets?
      Deux cas sont à considérer:
      1)Le cas où la fille est affectée:
      - la fille dont les parents sont infectés et malades est obligée d'abandonner les classes pour les assister

  8. Tim says:

    Q1
    What are the consequences of divided approaches to social protection?

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